• Penny Harter

Remembering Bill (William J.) Higginson

Tomorrow, October 11th, is the fifth anniversary of Bill’s (William J. Higginson) death. It doesn’t seem possible that five years have gone by already since we lost him. He was a very special man—one of a kind—and I and our family, as well as his / our personal and worldwide haiku friends, will always miss him very much. However, love doesn’t die when our dear ones die. They continue to love us and watch over us, and we continue to love them—though of course it’s not the same as having them with us in person. But with God’s help, and time, we are able to move on in our lives.

I am blessed with having been able to do so. Among other things, I am giving back in thanks for the support I received from leaders and fellow grievers in H.O.P.E., a grief support group / curriculum specifically for widows and widowers, with a number of chapters in South Jersey. Two years ago I became a “Group Leader” (assistant) and this summer accepted the responsibility of becoming a “Chapter Coordinator” (leader). It is a unique and rewarding kind of personal ministry to be able to help others through this hard journey. And of course, I wrote my way through grief, both in my chapbook Recycling Starlight and my e-chapbook One Bowl. This writing has really helped me heal!

I also continue my own work as a writer, and honor Bill by continuing our work in the haiku community. (As some fellow writers know, I’ve become enchanted by haibun :)). I have been able to make a new and fruitful life for myself, and I am blessed. Amazing Grace!

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